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In: ›alles in den Wind geschrieben‹
In: ›alles in den Wind geschrieben‹
In: ›alles in den Wind geschrieben‹
In: ›alles in den Wind geschrieben‹
In: ›alles in den Wind geschrieben‹
In: Analysis and Explication in 20th Century Philosophy

What does the way we clarify and revise concepts reveal about the nature of concepts? This paper investigates the ontological commitments of conceptual analysis and explication regarding their supposed subject matter–concepts. It demonstrates the benefits of a cognitivist account of concepts, according to which they are not items on which the subject operates cognitively, but rather ways in which the subject operates. The proposed view helps to handle alternating references to ‘concepts’ and ‘terms’ in instructions on analysis and explication. Furthermore, its virtue lies not in the capacity to render concepts ‘shareable’ but in its ontological parsimony.

In: Analysis and Explication in 20th Century Philosophy
Author: Moritz Cordes

Pseudoproblems, pseudoquestions, pseudosentences (etc.) constitute an iridescent group of concepts which were prominently used by the Vienna Circle (including Wittgenstein). In the course of an explication this paper presents a compilation of the many different meanings that were given to these expressions. This includes the more prominent Viennese approaches as well as a more recent one by Roy Sorensen. A novel proposal concerning the use of the term is made, suggesting that nothing is just a pseudoproblem, but only relative to a certain state of discourse. While the paper follows an explicative methodology, several uses of ‘pseudoproblem’ , including the explicated one, relate pseudoproblemhood to other kinds of analysis.

In: Analysis and Explication in 20th Century Philosophy
In: Analysis and Explication in 20th Century Philosophy
In: Analysis and Explication in 20th Century Philosophy