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Author: Robert Audi

Abstract

Kant influentially distinguished analytic from synthetic a priori propositions, and he took certain propositions in the latter category to be of immense philosophical importance. His distinction between the analytic and the synthetic has been accepted by many and attacked by others; but despite its importance, a number of discussions of it since at least W. V. Quine’s have paid insufficient attention to some of the passages in which Kant draws the distinction. This paper seeks to clarify what appear to be three distinct conceptions of the analytic (and implicitly of the synthetic) that are presented in Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason and in some other Kantian texts. The conceptions are important in themselves, and their differences are significant even if they are extensionally equivalent. The paper is also aimed at showing how the proposed understanding of these conceptions—and especially the one that has received insufficient attention from philosophers—may bear on how we should conceive the synthetic a priori, in and beyond Kant’s own writings.

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis
In: Das Problem der Nicht-Identität und die Grenzen der personenbezogenen Moral
In: Das Problem der Nicht-Identität und die Grenzen der personenbezogenen Moral
In: Das Problem der Nicht-Identität und die Grenzen der personenbezogenen Moral
Menschliche Schönheit ist eine eigenständige Form von Schönheit, die am besten als sinnlich wahrnehmbare Liebenswürdigkeit gedeutet werden kann.
Obwohl das Thema der menschlichen Schönheit in unserer Gesellschaft omnipräsent ist, wird es in der zeitgenössischen Philosophie nur am Rande diskutiert. Um die Debatte wiederzubeleben, wirft dieses Buch einen systematisch-analytischen und historischen Blick auf menschliche Schönheit und diskutiert dabei auch die Erkenntnisse der empirischen Attraktivitätsforschung. Den Ausgangspunkt bildet hierbei die Frage, ob menschliche Schönheit „von innen“ kommt. Inspiriert von Kants, Schillers und Burkes Sicht auf menschliche Schönheit entwickelt dieses Buch eine charakterologische Theorie, der zufolge menschliche Schönheit sinnlich wahrnehmbare Liebenswürdigkeit ist. Bei einem schönen Menschen trifft physische Schönheit auf den sinnlich wahrnehmbaren, körpergebundenen Ausdruck innerer Schönheit, verstanden als beziehungsrelevante Tugendhaftigkeit.
Eine Untersuchung zur epistemischen Abhängigkeit
Author: Felix Bräuer
Unter welchen Bedingungen sind wir geneigt, der Aussage eines Mitmenschen zu glauben?
In den meisten Fällen sind wir gerechtfertigt, der Aussage eines Mitmenschen zu glauben, sofern wir keinen konkreten Anlass haben, an seiner Verlässlichkeit zu zweifeln. Dies gilt jedoch nicht, wenn sehr hohe praktische Risiken mit einer Fehlinformation einhergehen. In einem solchen Fall benötigen wir stets erfahrungsbasierte Gründe, die für die besondere Kompetenz der fraglichen Person auf dem relevanten Gebiet sprechen. Das gilt unabhängig davon, ob wir konkreten Anlass dazu haben, an der Verlässlichkeit dieser Person zu zweifeln.
Author: Luca Gili

Abstract

According to Philoponus, the activity of drawing syllogisms is a dynamic operation. Following the classical idea that actions are specified by their objects and habitual powers by their actions, Philoponus concludes that only a dynamic power can elicit the act of syllogizing. This power is identified with discursive reasoning (dianoia). Imagination, on the contrary, is a static power, that cannot elicit that particular motion of drawing a syllogistic inference. The issue, however, is not entirely uncontroversial, because Ammonius maintains that sophistical syllogisms can only be formed by imagination, since they involve “empty concepts” as terms and only imagination can form such concepts. In this paper I will reconstruct Philoponus’ and Ammonius’ theories about the “activity” of syllogizing, and I shall explain how Philoponus can deal with sophistical syllogisms in a consistent way.

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis
Author: Jonathan Greig

Abstract

Damascius has become well-known in recent scholarship for his unique, radical use of the aporetic method, both to highlight the inherent limits of human thought and to reveal crucial tensions in Neoplatonic metaphysics. Though much attention has been paid to the subjective or skeptical aspects of Damascius’ aporiai, little has been noted of the parallels between Damascius’ aporetic strategy in the De Principiis and Aristotle’s own in Metaphysics B. This article analyzes the parallel by looking at Aristotle’s aim for aporiai in Metaphysics B.1 and closely comparing, as a case study, the De Principiis’ first aporia alongside Metaphysics B’s first aporia. Despite Damascius’ aporia dealing with different principles compared to Aristotle’s, the aporetic method for both ultimately exposes the limitations of thought and, exactly in the domain of these limitations, clarifies our concepts in relating to reality and attaining determinate understanding of principles.

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis