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that this strategy leads to seri- ous troubles: Insofar the Pyrrhonean arguments are at least partly philosophical in nature, they lead to a contradiction in the subject’s beliefs about his own beliefs. But this does not help the Pyrrhonist to reach his goal: On the one hand, facing a contradiction

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis
Author: Guy Schuh

contradictions in the text. What some may argue is the result of the interpolation of two different texts or others may argue is a merely apparent contradiction that must be rendered consistent by any acceptable interpretation may simply be an example of Aristotle deliberately revising or rejecting what he had

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis
Author: Graham Priest

To be and not to be - That is the Answer. On Aristotle on the Law of Non-Contradiction. Graham Priest, University of Queensland Contents 1 Introduction 2 The Law of Non-Contradiction (5hl8-22) 3 The Firmest of All Principles (5h22-35) 4 Aristotle's Opponents 5 Demonstration by Refutation (5

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis

true or false. Norms govern these nal judgments and, in virtue of that, they govern the process that arrives at those judgments. The principal norm is consistency. However, the philosophers differ on the source of this norm. For Plato, persuasiveness and accuracy ground non-contradiction because

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis

assumption that Leibniz reduces to absurdity does not play a relevant role. The last paragraph of the paper reformulates the whole Leibnizian argument in plural terms (i.e. by means of a plural logic) to show that it is possible to derive the contradiction that Leibniz uses in his argument even in the

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis

assumption that Leibniz reduces to absurdity does not play a relevant role. The last paragraph of the paper reformulates the whole Leibnizian argument in plural terms (i.e. by means of a plural logic) to show that it is possible to derive the contradiction that Leibniz uses in his argument even in the

In: Analysis and Explication in 20th Century Philosophy

The Canon Problem and the Explanatory Priority of Capacities Timothy Rosenkoetter, Dartmouth College Abstract This paper offers a novel solution to the long-standing puzzle of why the Canon of Pure Reason maintains, in contradiction to Kant’s position elsewhere in the first Critique, both that

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis

This paper deals with Leibniz’s well - known reductio argument against the infinite number. I will show that while the argument is in itself valid, the assumption that Leibniz reduces to absurdity does not play a relevant role. The last paragraph of the paper reformulates the whole Leibnizian argument in plural terms (i.e. by means of a plural logic) to show that it is possible to derive the contradiction that Leibniz uses in his argument even in the absence of the premise that he refutes.

In: Analysis and Explication in 20th Century Philosophy
Author: Peter Koepke

1 √ 2 is irrational. Proof 1 Assume √ 2 is rational. 2 Assume that √ 2= ab , and that 3 a is even implies that b is odd. 4 2= ab · a b = a·a b·b . 5 2 ·b ·b= a ·a. 6 Case 1. Assume a is odd. 7 2 ·b ·b is even. 8 a ·a is even. 9 a ·a is odd. 10 Contradiction. 11 Thus 12 a is odd implies a

In: Logik, Begriffe, Prinzipien des Handelns

Inescapable Moral Wrongdoing, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Grim, Patrick (2004), »What is a Contradiction?«, in: Priest/Bealll Armour- Garb (2004), 49-72. Haldane, John/Wright, Crispin (1993), (Hg.), Reality, Representation, and Pro- jection, Oxford: Oxford U niversity Press. HaIe, Bob (1993), »Can

In: Moralische Dilemmata als wahre Widersprüche