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Author: Peter Hinst

A Logical Analysis of the Main Argument in Chapter 2 of the Proslogion by Anselm of Canterbury Peter Hinst Abstract The primary aim is the reconstruction of the main argument of the second chapter of Anselm’s Proslogion. To be proved is the statement that God, or something than which nothing

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis
Author: Peter Hinst

Abstract A Logical Analysis of the Main Argument in Chapter 2 of the Proslogion by Anselm of Canterbury Peter Hinst The primary aim is the reconstruction of the main argument of the second chapter of Anselm's Proslogion. To be proved is the statement that God, or something than which nothing

In: Theory and Practice of Logical Reconstruction: Anselm as a Model Case
Editors: Uwe Meixner and Albert Newen
Mit Beiträgen von Amber Carpenter Erik Christensen Martha I. Gibson Alan Hájek Jean-Louis Hudry Dale Jacquette Holger A. Leuz Marko Malink Paul Needham Sonja Schierbaum Joachim Söder & Simon Weber Sara L. Uckelman Christian Wirrwitz Byeong-Uk Yi Buchbesprechungen von Stephan Herzberg, Charlotte Matheson, Barbara Vetter. Die Herausgeber: Uwe Meixner is professor of philosophy at the University of Regensburg. Albert Newen is professor of philosophy at the University of Bochum. ---------------------------------------- Uwe Meixner, Albert Newen (Hrsg.) Focus: Ancient and Medieval Philosophy Schwerpunkt: Antike und Mittelalterliche Philosophie 2009. 329 pp., Paperback, EUR 44,- [D] ISBN 978-3-89785-161-0 Subskription: EUR 38,- [D]
Author: Christian Tapp

can appear as part of the explicit question of what justies the use, by authors such as Anselm of Canterbury, of denite descriptions such as “that than which nothing greater can be conceived”. Successfully using denite descriptions usually presupposes that there is at most one object that fullls the

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis
Author: Geo Siegwart

common structure. The third objective is a tentative characterization of the nature and function of parodies of arguments. It seems that parodying does not add new pertinent points of view to the usual criticism of an argument. In 1076 A.D. Anselm of Canterbury wrote his rst theological work, the

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis
Author: Michael Wreen

): 202–206. doi:10.5840/faithphil19874216. Hinst, P. 2014. A Logical Analysis of the Main Argument in Chapter 2 of Proslogion by Anselm of Canterbury. Logical Analysis and the History of Philosophy 17: 22–44. Hintikka, J. 1981. Kant on Existence, Predication, and the Ontological Argument. Dialectica 35

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis
Author: Georg Brun

Institute for Environmental Decisions at ETH Zurich. References DCD Anselm of Canterbury. De casu diaboli. In: Opera Omnia, Schmitt (ed.) 1968. Stuttgart-Bad Cannstatt: Frommann-Holzboog. Vol. 1, 231–76. Barwise, J./Etchemendy, J. 2008. Language, Proof and Logic. Stanford: CSLI. Baumgartner, M./Lampert, T

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis

, I will here and there refer to the extensive debates about the formalizations of the arguments for the existence of God (as id quo maius cogitari nequit) found in Anselm of Canterbury’s Proslogion 2 and 3. 2. A note on terminology: “formalization”, “semi-formalization”, and “rational reconstruction

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis

the prerequisites, presuppositions and the logical structure of natural language arguments. The scope and limits of this method have become visible not least through its intense application to Anselm of Canterbury’s notorious proofs for the existence of God. This volume collects, on the one hand

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis

parts exist, then all of its parts – and thus the thing as a whole – can be thought never or nowhere to exist. (Anselm of Canterbury 2000, 121) Obviously, these translations differ quite substantially from each other (and from my own translation above). Due to the underdetermination of natural language

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis