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Author: Luca Castagnoli

Aristotle on Begging the Question Between Dialectic, Logic and Epistemology Luca Castagnoli, Durham University Abstract The article examines Aristotle’s seminal discussion of the fallacy of begging the question (petitio principii), reconstructing its complex articulation within a variety of

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis
Author: Paolo Fait

The “false validating premiss” in Aristotle’s doctrine of fallacies An interpretation of Sophistical Refutations 8* Paolo Fait, New College, Oxford Abstract In Sophistical Refutations 8 Aristotle claims that every sophistical refutation depends on a false belief which is implicitly held by the

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis
Author: Jonathan Greig

thus far little-appreciated aspect of Damascius’ aporiai in the De Principiis, especially with regard to the first aporia : the reception and use of Aristotle’s aporetic and dialectical strategy, especially from Metaphysics (= Met.) Beta. Though Damascius certainly has his own style of

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis
Author: David Bronstein

Aristotle’s Critique of Plato’s Theory of Innate Knowledge1 David Bronstein Abstract In Posterior Analytics 2.19, Aristotle argues that we cannot have innate knowledge of rst principles because if we did we would have the most precise items of knowledge without noticing, which is impossible. To

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis
Author: Boris Hennig

definition of a natural thing. Since Aristotle seems to firmly deny that the matter of a substance is part of its essence, I will consider the following three options. First, there might be definitions of compounds, which specify more than the essence of a thing, namely also its matter. Second, one might

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis
Author: Christof Rapp

Fallacious Arguments in Aristotle’s Rhetoric II.241 Christof Rapp, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München Abstract Just as Aristotelian dialectic sharply distinguishes between real and fallacious argu- ments, Aristotelian rhetoric distinguishes between real and fallacious enthymemes. For this

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis

Why Aristotle’s Sea-Battle Argument is Valid Michael Groneberg, Université de Lausanne Abstract The paper tries to demonstrate the validity of Aristotle’s sea-battle argument, which is still considered as invalid by many authors. The first part presents the usual reconstruction of Aristotle’s

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis
Author: Lucas Angioni

Aristotle’s Denition of Scientic Knowledge (APo 71b 9–12) Lucas Angioni Abstract In Posterior Analytics 71b9–12, we nd Aristotle’s denition of scientic knowledge. The deniens is taken to have only two informative parts: scientic knowledge must be knowledge of the cause and its object must be

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis
Author: Carrie Swanson

Aristotle’s Expansion of the Taxonomy of Fallacy in De Sophisticis Elenchis 8 Carrie Swanson, University of Indiana at Bloomington Abstract In the eighth chapter of De Sophisticis Elenchis, Aristotle introduces a mode of sophistical refutation that constitutes an addition to the taxonomy of the

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis

Aristotle identifies philosophical theōria as our complete happiness as human beings. But does this activity require an understanding that is simply too demanding for us to possess? Aristotle’s contemporary, Isocrates, answers yes. In Isocrates’ view, theoretical philosophers, who focus on

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis