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Author: Lee Franklin

The Origins of Dialectic in Ordinary Discourse (Meno 71b9–75a8) Lee Franklin Abstract The opening discussion of the Meno features a halting conversation in which Meno struggles at length to answer Socrates’ question, “What is Virtue?” Whereas Socrates demands a unitary account, presenting Virtue as

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis
Author: Robert Bolton

Dialectic, Peirastic and Scientific Method in Aristotle’s Sophistical Refutations Robert Bolton, Rutgers University Abstract In Metaphysics IV.2 Aristotle assigns a very specific role to dialectic in philosophical and scientific inquiry. This role consists of the use of the special form of

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis

Between Science and Dialectic Aristotle’s Account of Good and Bad Peirastic Arguments in the Sophistical Refutations Pieter Sjoerd Hasper, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München Abstract How do, according to Aristotle, peirastic arguments, which are employed by non- scientists to put professed

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis
Author: Carrie Swanson

apparent refutation are sophistical – and whose solutions are therefore the task of no special science but of a dialectical sullogistikò tËqnh (172a35). I conclude my analysis with the observation that Aristotle exploits the results of SE 8 to fend off in SE 9, 10, and 11 respectively a triad of threats to

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis
Author: Christof Rapp

Fallacious Arguments in Aristotle’s Rhetoric II.241 Christof Rapp, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München Abstract Just as Aristotelian dialectic sharply distinguishes between real and fallacious argu- ments, Aristotelian rhetoric distinguishes between real and fallacious enthymemes. For this

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis

really not, and how this disqualifies such arguments from being dialectical. In the first section of the paper I interpret Aristotle’s notion of Índoxa in terms of a relational concept of acceptability. Real Índoxa are propositions which are accepted by a qualified group or individual. False Índoxa may

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis
Author: Luca Castagnoli

Aristotle on Begging the Question Between Dialectic, Logic and Epistemology Luca Castagnoli, Durham University Abstract The article examines Aristotle’s seminal discussion of the fallacy of begging the question (petitio principii), reconstructing its complex articulation within a variety of

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis
Author: Justin Vlasits

to the extent that dealing with them [i.e., syllogisms] is useful for demonstration and for the discovery of what is true” ( In Analyticorum Priorum Librum I 8,22–25). A middle Platonist such as Alcinous also claims explicitly that dialectic is fundamentally about how one comes to know, in his case

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis
Author: Robert Bolton

Dialectic, Peirastic and Scientific Method in Aristotle's Sophistical Refutations Robert Bolton, Rutgers University Abstract In Metaphysics IV.2 Aristotle assigns a very specific role to dialectic in philosophical and scientific inquiry. This role consists of the use of the special form of

In: Fallacious Arguments in Ancient Philosophy
Author: Luca Castagnoli

Aristotle on Begging the Question Between Dialectic, Logic and Epistemology Luca Castagnoli, Durharn University Abstract The article examines Aristotle's seminal discussion of the faIlacy of begging the question (petitio principii), reconstructing its complex articulation within a variety of

In: Fallacious Arguments in Ancient Philosophy