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Hermeneutics, Logic and Reconstruction Friedrich Reinmuth (Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald) Abstract Using a short excerpt from Anselm’s Responsio as an example, this paper tries to present logical reconstruction as a special type of exegetical interpretation by paraphrase that is subject

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Scepticism and Logic1 Jan Wolenski, Jagellonian University Krakow Scepticism is often accused of being inconsistent and thereby self-refuting. My aim in this paper is to show that scepticism is internally coherent, which does not mean that this view is acceptable. In fact, scepticism raises

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medieval logic, January 2007, and those of the Square of Opposition International Congress, June 2007, for stimulating and helpful discussion on earlier versions of this paper, and also the useful suggestions of the two anonymous referees.

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Tense Logic and the Master Argument Richard Gaskin, University of Sussex The establishment in our century of the discipline of tense logic has, apart from its purely formal interest and the insights it has conferred into the functioning of natural language, immeasurably enhanced our ability to

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various topics dogmatists classify under “logic”. It does contain such an inquiry, but as part of a bigger project to undercut the objection from dogmatic methods. The significance of this thesis is not merely limited to giving us a better understanding of Sextus’ treatment of logic. If successful, this

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Aristotle on Begging the Question Between Dialectic, Logic and Epistemology Luca Castagnoli, Durham University Abstract The article examines Aristotle’s seminal discussion of the fallacy of begging the question (petitio principii), reconstructing its complex articulation within a variety of

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History of Philosophy in General Philosophiegeschichte im Allgemeinen Zum Begriff der einfachen Supposition im 13. Jhdt. Raina Kirchhoff, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf Abstract In mediaeval logic a common term is often said to supposit simply, if it supposits for a concept and not for the

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around 1930 and in its defence attempted to combine the reduction of mathematics to logic undertaken in the Principia with Wittgenstein’s insights into the nature of logic. In this paper I will show that this synthesis faces serious difficulties. Thus, it plays, with good reason, no longer a role in

In: History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis
The Sorites Paradox and the Nature and Logic of Vague Language
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This book examines philosophical approaches to linguistic vagueness, a puzzling feature of natural language that gives rise to the ancient Sorites Paradox and challenges classical logic and semantics.
The Sorites, or Paradox of the Heap, consists in three claims: (1) One grain of sand does not make a heap. (2) One billion grains of sand do make a heap. (3) For any two amounts of sand differing by at most one grain: either both are heaps of sand, or neither one is. The third claim is rendered plausible by an initial conviction that vague predicates like ‘heap’ tolerate small changes. However, the repeated application of a tolerance principle to the second claim yields the further proposition that one grain of sand does make a heap – which contradicts claim number one. Consequently, many philosophers reject or modify tolerance principles for vague predicates.
Inga Bones reassesses prominent responses to the Sorites and defends a Wittgensteinian dissolution of the paradox. She argues that vague predicates are, indeed, tolerant and discusses how this finding relates to the paradox itself, to the notion of validity and to the concept of a borderline case.
Free Logic is an important field of philosophical logic. It appeared first in the 1950s, and Karel Lambert was one of its founders and coined the term. The volume begins with three of Lambert’s most recent essays. These papers are followed by a dialogue between Karel Lambert and Edgar Morscher on free logic. The second part of the volume contains papers by Peter Simons and Edgar Morscher on free logic. A systematic and historical survey of free logic with an annotated bibliography of works on free logic completes the book.